A ‘Real World’ Process

By Robert Carpenter, Editor | August 2010 Vol. 65 No. 8

When discussing the Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition with past attendees of varied backgrounds, many different reasons and perspectives are brought up as to what everyone likes best about UCT:

• The industry’s largest event dedicated to the underground construction and rehabilitation markets;
• The now famous, interactive RehabZone;
• The very timely WaterWorks Conference;
• The underground industry’s largest exhibit dedicate to both trenchless and open-cut construction;
• The diverse audience of contractors, owners, engineers and vendors;
• The renewed emphasis, especially from the utility contractors perspectives, on damage prevention and safety;
• The fact that UCT encompasses all aspects of the underground piping market – both open-cut and trenchless;
• And much more, depending upon on the broad perspectives of attendees.

Among the most consistent responses are overwhelmingly positive comments regarding the benchmark UCT educational program. It’s good to know that the UCT Educational Program is “still famous after all these years.”

Indeed, when the first UCT Show became an instant hit and market leader in January 1995, the educational program was praised for its unique, “real world” approach to providing critical information and education to contractors, owners and engineers.

The UCT educational program is much more than just technical presentations. It also includes case studies, important industry issues, how to do accomplish a project in a more cost efficient manner, how to maximize preparation and enhance profitability. That approach has continued to be an overwhelming success and the benchmark by which all other educational efforts have subsequently been compared.

“Real world” means just what the name implies -- our daily industry lives dealing with a broad range of needs and issue: difficult soil conditions; wrestling with equipment performance; searching for a better, more economical and efficient methods to execute a project; putting the pieces together and developing the best path forward for clients; and weighing critical needs against limited budgets. In short, real world means life in our industry and how can we do a better job in challenging times.