ALLU Screener Crusher Bucket Wins Project For Carstensen Contracting

October 2013, Vol. 68 No. 10
Carstensen Contracting using their ALLU Screener Crusher bucket to help lower the pipe into the trench for placement.

In late summer 2012, Carstensen Contracting Inc., Pipestone, MN, learned of an opportunity to bid on a water pipe-laying project in Oklahoma. Prior to bidding the project, Carstensen Contracting searched for a screener crusher bucket that would work in the rocky terrain and allow them to reuse the material on site, thus allowing them to underbid other contractors who would have had to haul in bedding material.

“We install 200 to 400 miles of water line annually,” says Ricky Carstensen, company president. “Last year, in a push to keep key employees busier in the winter, we started bidding jobs in Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma.”

Carstensen did some research and talked to contractors who owned different types of buckets and were advised to try the ALLU Screener Crusher bucket. Satisfied with the other contractors’ first-hand reports of success with ALLU’s bucket, Carstensen contacted ALLU Group and purchased one. Carstensen Contracting successfully bid the Oklahoma job in September 2012 and began work on the project in the spring of 2013.

“We were significantly cheaper than the other bidders because of that one particular bidding spec,” Carstensen says. “You could either import bedding from a source about 30 miles away, or you could screen and use the existing material by taking the rock out of it. We were the only one that bid with that thought process. It virtually saved the project for us, because we didn’t have the added expense of using dump trucks to haul in the bedding.”

ALLU makes over 100 models to fit any size excavator, loader, backhoe or skid steer ranging from one to five-yard bucket capacity. For this particular job, Carstensen purchased an ALLU DH 3-12-25 Screener Crusher processing bucket and mounted the processor on a Komatsu 210 excavator.

“The bucket works extremely well in dry material, but after the tremendous amount of rain that fell in Oklahoma this spring, it proved to work just as well in wet material,” comments Carstensen.

Project details

The Oklahoma project involved the placement of water lines ranging in size from two to 10-inches in diameter and buried at about 36 inches. To make sure the pipe was protected from any damage once it was buried, the trench was dug to a depth of 40-inches and a width of 24 inches.