Antonio Almeida Selected 2013 MVP Honoree

By Traci Read, Managing Editor | April 2013, Vol. 68 No. 4
Representatives of the UCTA present Antonio Almeida (center) with the 2012 MVP award.

“To truly appreciate Tony’s contribution to our industry, we have to go back to a time when trenchless technology was truly in its infancy,” Oradat said. “Think back to the first time you heard about cured-in-place pipe, or fold-n-form, or the various forms of profile wall PVC pipe. Today, these are common place; however, in the 1990s, many of these products and rehabilitation techniques were fighting to gain traction in the marketplace. Before that could take place, they first had to gain a stamp of legitimacy. That need drove them to Committee F-17 of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The national chairman of F-17 was Tony Almeida.

“Not only was Tony the committee chair, he was also one of only a handful of public servants who were actively involved in ASTM. Tony not only kept the various interested and competing parties in check, he also took it upon himself to ensure that the public interest was always protected. He did this by making sure the ASTM process was open, fair and available to all.

“Under Tony’s leadership, the vast majority of trenchless products which benefit the public today were marshaled through the ASTM process. Under Tony’s leadership, ASTM’s Trenchless Technology Subcommittee (F17-67) was created.

“But make no mistake, his leadership came at a price. Any yet, through it all, Tony maintained the highest standards of professionalism and character, and served both the public interest and our industry with integrity.”

Background
After earning a Bachelor of Science degree in civil engineering from Texas Tech University in 1971, Almeida would go on to garner more than 41 years of experience in the water and wastewater industry, both in municipal engineering and private consulting. Almeida started his career at Dallas Water Utilities (DWU) as a design engineer where he gained experience in all phases of the utilities department’s operations, ranging from planning, budgeting, contracts, design and construction for both facilities and pipelines.

In 1985, Almeida became the division manager for an $80 million water and wastewater pipeline design program for Dallas. In 1987, he became deputy director of construction for both facilities and pipelines, managing 250 employees and four construction divisions for a $147,000,000 annual program. In 1989, he became deputy director of the $35 million pipeline program for design and construction.