Antonio Almeida Selected 2013 MVP Honoree

By Traci Read, Managing Editor | April 2013, Vol. 68 No. 4
Representatives of the UCTA present Antonio Almeida (center) with the 2012 MVP award.

“The most rewarding experience was not a project that brought me recognition or publicity,” he explained. “It has been the opportunity to mentor young professionals in my field. It is with great pride that I contributed to the career development of many utility directors and consulting engineers in our great state of Texas. It would be impossible to quantify how many lives their contributions have impacted. I am grateful to be a part of that.”

Rehab advocate
As a member of ASTM for more 25 years, Almeida continues to be actively involved in helping deliver the test methods, specifications, guides and practices that support industries and governments worldwide. For his contributions and length of service, Almeida has received “Fellow” status.

Almeida currently serves on six ASTM subcommittees which produce standards that govern the production and quality of pipe products used in the water and wastewater industry.

“I realized early in my career that ASTM standards for products I was installing dictated the useful service life of the pipelines and appurtenances,” said Almeida. “To be a good steward of the public’s trust, I decided to participate and express the user’s interest in the development of ASTM standards. This endeavor also increased my knowledge and network of experts in the industry.”

Almeida’s initial involvement in trenchless activities began in the 1980s when the techniques were referred to as BOTC – by other than open cut. Almeida explains that when he was a chief design engineer working at DWU, he met with Bob Affholder, Affholder/Mid America, who had a chance meeting on a plane with Tom Driver who talked to him about Insituform, an emerging trenchless leader in trenchless technology. Once his curiosity was peaked, it wasn’t long before Affholder/Mid America employees, Jim Scott and Mark Slack, visited Almeida to demonstrate cured-in-place pipe (CIPP). Soon after, they began volunteering at ASTM to write F-1216, the ASTM standard for CIPP.

When asked where he thinks the future of trenchless technology lies, Almeida believes “it will expand to fill the void created by the deteriorating, existing sub-surface infrastructure. As more and more utilities begin to develop asset management programs, and those assets are identified as needed to be replaced or rehabilitated, the trenchless toolbox will be called upon to provide solutions. The products and technology will sell itself.”