Changes To Historical Procedure Can Relieve Worker, Equipment Shortage

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | August 2008 Vol. 63 No. 8

"Owners," said Sheehan, "are coming around, but often can't get their projects ready to meet specific windows of opportunity. Then if you get several lined up and the first job slips, that affects the second job and so on until a disaster occurs."

There are reasons the pipeline industry has never worked throughout the year, he continued. One of the most significant is the weather – rains in the Northeast and the South in winter; cold, snow and ice in the Rockies, High Plains and the Upper Midwest; hurricanes in Gulf states and the East Coast.

"However," he said, "regulatory agencies comprise the biggest and most immovable obstruction to year round scheduling. Their dates for environmental windows do not change and they are basically inflexible. This will prevent year round work in all applicable areas whether it is big game range, trout streams, raptors, etc."

Sheehan Pipe Line started continuous scheduling early in 2007 with results that Sheehan describes as having "some" success. The program continued through the winter with three major spreads incorporating nine or 10 separate jobs.

Results

The benefits? It has improved the company's ability to attract, train and retain workers. Equipment is utilized throughout the year, moving from one job directly to the next, reducing downtime when machines sit idle.

Weather is a factor outside everyone's control, always posing a risk of delay and interruption. It increases work costs and poses scheduling problems for the next projects.

Do employees like year round scheduling?

"Straight time workers become tired and want time off," said Sheehan. "There is a lot of turnover, but workers are making a lot of money. Hourly workers go home whenever they feel like it. We need extra sets of support staff to start a new job or finish the old job."

What lessons were learned over the past year and a half?

"It is possible to stack all the jobs back to back to back, but it takes a tremendous effort to manage all the problems that arise and there is no time left in the day," said Sheehan. "Large jobs take on a life of their own after a while and not much you can do has any effect. Just hang on and enjoy the ride."

Based in Tulsa, OK, the Sheehan Pipe Line Construction Co. is described by Sheehan as the oldest and one of the largest pipeline construction contractors in the United States. Capabilities include construction of cross country main lines to 42 inches in diameter, relocation or replacement of existing lines, cleaning and re-coating existing lines, river crossings and pipe take-up.