David Kavanaugh Elected President At PLCAC’s 58th Convention

By Traci Read, Managing Editor | July 2012, Vol. 67, No. 7

For the 350 delegates who attended the Pipe Line Contractors Association of Canada’s (PLCAC) 58th annual meeting, it was a time to reflect on the association’s busy year and its many accomplishments.

The PLCAC convention was held in June at the luxurious Fairmont Chateau Hotel nestled at the base of Blackcomb Mountain in Whistler, British Columbia.

Featured speakers included John Carruthers, president of Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines; Michael Economides, and energy geopolitics expert and chemical and petroleum engineer who is a professor at the Cullen College of Engineering at the University of Houston, Houston, TX, and is a managing partner of Dr. Michael J. Economides Consultants Inc.; and inspirational adventurer Warren MacDonald.

Presiding over this year’s meeting was association president Nick deKoning, president of Robert B. Somerville Co. Ltd. deKoning noted several accomplishments and how many contractors finished the year strong. “Over the past year, the PLCAC has been very busy working on a number of rewarding initiatives. They include the successful renegotiation of another three years for its maintenance and service agreement; and increasing and combining the efforts of the PLCAC and the four craft pipeline trade unions to target individual projects being bid by non-union contractors through enabled agreements.”

Among the other accomplishments in 2011, the association completed a three-year renewal process for the PLCAC’s pipeline computer based safety training program and increased partnership between the Canadian Pipeline Advisory Council and the owner clients that resulted in a sharing of ideas between owners, contractors and the four craft pipeline trade unions.

According to deKoning, work activity picked up speed as 2011 progressed and the future looks even brighter over the next decade when mainline projects planned are expected to total more than 8,000 kilometers (4,970 miles). “Mainline work was particularly busy for contractors with projects being awarded late in the year,” he said. “Diversified projects consisted of 20-inch to 48-inch diameter pipe, totaling over 550 kilometers (342 miles). Distribution work continued to be steady in Eastern Canada while its activity grew in Western Canada primarily due to its growing economy and population.”