Editor's Log

We’ve talked a lot in recent years about the “disruptive” influence of horizontal directional drilling upon the underground construction industry. HDD is a technology that has forever changed the way contractors, engineers and owners approach their construction projects.

Getting tired of constant Keystone XL Pipeline updates? Getting weary of the incessant anti-Keystone rhetoric being spread by a seemingly never-ending group of environmental and anti-fossil fuel zealots?

Robert Carpenter, Editor

There was a time, back in the 90s, when the horizontal directional drilling market was a huge segment of the annual Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition. Since then, UCT has grown to truly encompass all aspects of the underground marketplace with construction and rehabilitation of sewer and water systems topping the list.

In this issue of Underground Construction, we’re proud to present our annual Buyer’s Guide. It includes the most comprehensive coverage of equipment available specifically for the underground construction and rehabilitation industry.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

Summer in North America brings heat. But this year, it has brought record heat. When Fairbanks, AK, hits the 90s and we get pictures of shore side sunbathers in bikinis – from Anchorage, AK, nonetheless – you know it is hot! Death Valley, CA, hit 130 degrees on June 30 – hot even by that location’s standards.

Headlining this issue of Underground Construction is our industry-exclusive horizontal directional drilling survey (published online on June 17). This marks 15 years of research into the amazing HDD market that has evolved at an incredible rate, evolving from a utility and pipeline construction novelty to a necessity in a relatively short period of time.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

Accepting responsibility for our mistakes is something that never comes easy for individuals. So it is no surprise that often it is even harder for large organizations or corporations to also own up to their mistakes and react in a responsible manner.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

As an industry, we talk a lot these days about the importance and value of damage prevention. Safety is included in the conversation. Accidental deaths in the construction industry, particularly the underground segment, have fallen sharply over the past decade.

I’ve been asked by many people if the main section of the Keystone XL Pipeline, from Canada to Oklahoma, will be built now that a revised route has been approved both by the state of Nebraska and TransCanada. The new route reportedly will avoid the most ecologically sensitive regions of Nebraska.

It was a desperate cry for help, presented in powerful and disturbing comments from municipal respondents to the recently completed 16th Annual Sewer & Water Infrastructure Survey conducted by Underground Construction.

Syndicate content