Editor's Log

Robert Carpenter, Editor

Traditionally, the June issue of Underground Construction carries a large section focused on various equipment utilized in the underground construction industry. I’m pleased to say this issue is no different.

By now, most people in North America – indeed, around the world – are well aware of the growing energy treasure trove being discovered in shale rock.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

A notable, five-year anniversary was reached recently for a benchmark industry damage prevention program. And while it received some publicity, perhaps the program didn’t get as much attention as it deserved, especially when one considers the benefits – including health and safety – that have been credited to a simple three digit number: 811.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

The proposed Federal Highway Bill was big news in the mass media and construction press in late February/early March. I suspect thefunding debate will be continuing well into the spring months.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

As last summer’s drought conditions wore on, I learned that there is a condition even worse than “extreme.” There is an “exceptional” drought category, which essentially means “pending devastation if you don’t get rain fast.” The impact of this drought, when finally broken, will be felt for years.

Ben Garber

In reading your excellent editorial on the above subject, it stirred my memory back to the 50s when I, as a young pipeliner, was in Alaska Territory, involved in the building of an eight-inch fuel line from Haines to Fairbanks.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

The enemy of my enemy is my friend. Those words have been used in books and movies to dramatic effect. But in the world of energy, they take on a similar – though substantially less violent – meaning.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

It was the “political punt” heard around the energy world. Rather than making a final determination regarding the fate of the Keystone XL Pipeline project, President Obama effectively sidestepped making a decision. Instead, he opted for an unprecedented fourth environmental impact study that would explore alternate routes to avoid the environmentally sensitive Sandhills region and Ogallala aquifer in Nebraska.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

The oil industry is a market full of intangibles, plenty of knee-jerk reactions from investors and a dynamic that often defies logic and clear-cut forecasts. For the U.S., there are several constants that continue to influence the industry. Perhaps the most notable is that the majority of our oil continues to be imported.

There are many types of awards or special recognition bestowed annually in our industry -- the underground infrastructure construction and rehabilitation market. Most are well-deserved and for the right reasons (though there does seem to be a lot of “political” thinking involved in some of that recognition – but that’s a conversation for another day).

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