Editor's Log

Robert Carpenter, Editor

It’s no surprise that utilities in new subdivisions typically are placed underground. But what’s really encouraging is that a growing number of cities and states are suggesting or, in some cases, actually stipulating that older lines should be moved underground when feasible.

I was pleasantly surprised recently when the annual American Society of Civil Engineers’ Pipeline Conference experienced strong attendance.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

I read recently that a bipartisan group of lawmakers is proposing to raise about $10 billion a year for the rehabilitation of sewer and water systems. The funding sources?

Robert Carpenter, Editor

Over the past 15 years, the underground utility rehabilitation market has exhibited a strong pattern of growth, particularly in the sewer and storm water market.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

This issue contains the 2009 edition of Underground Construction’s annual horizontal directional drilling survey. This industry-exclusive research always provides an insightful perspective as to the direction and health of this vibrant young industry.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

I’ve been hearing some encouraging housing news. Economic experts are reporting that the devastating housing meltdown the country has been experiencing for some time has just about reached its economic bottom, or is in the process of bottoming out.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

In his proposed 2010 budget, President Obama has proposed a huge increase for sewer and water funding. His budget proposal is $2.4 billion for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund and $1.5 billion for the Drinking Water State Revolving Funds.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

The stimulus posturing, debating and finagling is now over, a done deal. The dye is cast as to how the money is being allocated; now states/agencies begin the mad dash to grab their fair share of the money. About the only thing undecided at the Federal level is who is going to pay for all this . . .

Robert Carpenter, Editor

It’s hard to believe in the future when every day you are told that the future is bleak. At least that’s the story we’re being bombarded with by national media. But the recent strength of the annual Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition was a refreshing breath of optimism and hope in an otherwise environment of despair.

Robert Carpenter

The presidential and Congressional elections of 2008 are over. For better or worse, our nation’s course seems set for the next four years. Economic stimulus talk is running rampant again in Washington. God help us, maybe they’ll get it right and make public works, especially underground infrastructure, a key part of any stimulus package?

Second nature

Syndicate content