Education Key To Addressing Growing Lateral Issues

Part 3 In An Ongoing Series
By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | December 2010 Vol. 65 No. 12

NASSCO And Lateral Rehabilitation
NASSCO -- the National Association of Sewer Service Companies -- and its members have a vital interest in opening the way for restoring the nation’s sanitary sewer lateral infrastructure. NASSCO Executive Director Ted DeBoda and Gerry Muenchmeyer, NASSCO technical director, offered the following observations as an addendum to this article:

As more municipalities and utilities make improvements to their sanitary sewer collection systems in the name of reducing I&I, we will further begin to understand that private property is a significant source of extraneous flows to the system. In addition to normal lateral pipe infiltration, flows will increase after main lines are repaired and groundwater migrates to the lateral pipe. In addition to flows from lateral pipes, system owners will also need to address the impact of roof drains, broken cleanout caps acting as area drains, and sump pump connections. Whether these issues are addressed by local regulations requiring private lateral pipe owners to make corrections, public capital improvement funding, or some combination of the two, assessment of private property pipes will be more common in the future.

NASSCO will continue to assist the industry by providing the Laterals Assessment & Certification Program, a standardized approach to lateral assessment based on the highly successful Pipe Assessment & Certification Program. And like PACP, this program will focus on gathering useful and appropriate data that can be used to program the most cost effective asset repair, replacement and rehabilitation plan. NASSCO currently provides a number of specification guidelines for lateral renewal and repair, and may establish performance based specifications sometime in the future. NASSCO also provides the Inspector Training and Certification Program for CIPP which includes not only the inspection of mainlines but also lateral pipes.

Finally, NASSCO will continue to actively participate in educating municipalities and utilities of the impact of private lateral sewer problems and potential corrective actions that are being implemented by others in the industry. Such training is valuable not only to collection system operators and managers, but to politicians and the public, who will need to write the regulations and/or provide for the finances necessary for lateral sewer maintenance and repair in the future.