environment

Industry efforts are well underway to assist with the relief efforts stemming from Hurricane Sandy that that devastated portions of the Caribbean, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeastern United States during late October 2012, with lesser impacts in the Southeastern, Midwestern states and Eastern Canada.

The National Association of Clean Water Agencies (NACWA), the Water Environment Federation (WEF), and the Association of Clean Water Administrators (ACWA) along with local utilities and others in the clean water community came together to celebrate 40 years of accomplishments under the Clean Water Act (CWA) and to call for a new vision to ensure further water quality progress.

The results of the November presidential and congressional elections portend "more of the same" with regard to issues of interest to the gas transmission industry. Current regulatory dockets already underway will continue along their current track. Those dockets concern greenhouse gas emissions, the integrity management program and fracking.

Improving the quality of wastewater service is daunting in the face of the challenges posed by aging of the networks of pipes and pumping stations; over 800,000 miles of water pipe and 600,000 miles of wastewater infrastructure with some components over 100 years old.

ConocoPhillips Alaska, among the most active companies exploring for oil and gas in northern Alaska, found a lot not to like in the Obama administration decision in mid-August with regard to development of the 22.8 million acre National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska.

The largest solar farm of its kind in North America elected to locate power and control cables in underground conduit made from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) as a way to increase the life of the facility. The 2.2 MW solar farm covers 25 acres and includes 382 solar trackers.

By now, most people in North America – indeed, around the world – are well aware of the growing energy treasure trove being discovered in shale rock.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Failed crops drooping over dry, rock-hard soil backed by record heat . . . dried lake beds and farm ponds . . . reservoirs falling to dangerously-low levels . . . wildfires burning tens of thousands of acres, consuming everything in their path . . .

And the list goes on.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

As last summer’s drought conditions wore on, I learned that there is a condition even worse than “extreme.” There is an “exceptional” drought category, which essentially means “pending devastation if you don’t get rain fast.” The impact of this drought, when finally broken, will be felt for years.

Stephen Barlas, Washington Editor

The One-Call and excavation damage provisions included in the new pipeline safety bill passed by Congress in December will trigger a number of state and federal responses in 2012. However, a rule allowing the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) to impose civil penalties on excavators -- ordered by the 2006 pipeline safety bill but never finalized -- would be even more significant. A proposed rule moving that requirement forward is expected this year, finally, perhaps as early as this winter.

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