Equipment Spotlight: Gas & Water Leak Detection

July 2014, Vol. 69 No. 7
Heath Consultants' RMLD-IS laser-based natural gas detector

New gas and water leak detection equipment by Moffatt Enterprises, Heath Consultants, Echologics, Aries Industries, SubSurface Leak Detection,
Pure Technologies and SENSIT Technologies.

Moffatt Enterprises
Find a leak in less than 30 seconds before it is buried, without pressure by testing each pipe joint as it is laid. An ultrasonic transmitter is used in coordination with an ultrasonic detector to find the leak. The detector converts inaudible ultrasonic signals into audible tones and amplifies them for ease of detection. By placing the transmitter on the inside of a pipe or test item, the signal will seek out and penetrate any hole in the pipe or joint. 541.548.1144

Heath Consultants
Heath’s intrinsically safe RMLD-IS is an eye-safe laser-based natural gas detector (methane) that can quickly and efficiently detect leaks up to one hundred feet away allowing remote detection of difficult to access places such as busy roadways, locked yards, underground piping, compressor stations and offshore platforms. When the infrared laser beam is transmitted from the launch port, some of the laser light is reflected back and converted to an electrical signal that carries the information needed to deduce the methane concentration. The RMLD-IS has proven to be a highly effective leak survey instrument, compared to flame ionization and similar equipment, but with the added advantage of remote detection. 800-HEATH-US, heathus.com

Echologics
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Utilities can now accurately detect and monitor leaks on selected water transmission mains from the office—24/7—with the availability of the EchoShore system, a fixed leak detection solution from Echologics. The EchoShore system leverages components of Echologics’ next-generation LeakFinderRT technology and combines it with GPS and cellular telemetry, creating a network capable of continuously monitoring critical water transmission mains and alerting utilities to leaks before they result in catastrophic main breaks. Using sound properties to track the noise activity in a transmission main, the EchoShore system is designed to collect data and send it to a central receiver. The acoustic vibrations are then analyzed to determine the precise location of a leak. The system is designed to alert utilities to the leak location and leak size via email, SMA, phone call or an Echologics-based customer interface. 888-ECHOLOG, echologics.com