Erosion Control Increasingly Important For Utility Construction

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | July 2010 Vol. 65 No. 7

With the decline of construction projects during the current recession, Oklahoma Erosion Control’s demand for silt fences has declined.

“We are going slow and maintaining,” Alexander observed.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Oklahoma Erosions Control (405) 334-8905
Ditch Witch, (800) 654-6481, www.ditchwitch.com

Silt Fence Vibratory Plow Installation
The newest method for installing silt fencing material is vibratory plowing, a proven technology that has been used for decades to install electrical and communications cable and small-diameter piping.

Vibratory plow silt fence attachments are available to fit tractors and various host vehicles, and Ditch Witch, a pioneer in the development of vibratory plowing equipment for utility applications, has adapted vibratory plowing technology for silt fence installation.

The Ditch Witch silt fence package includes a reel carrier to hold the supply of geotextile fabric, special plow blade and a guide wheel to position fabric at the required depth during installation. A small wheel is positioned behind the blade and rides on the ground’s surface to minimize surface disturbance.

Ditch Witch says the vibrating action of the system allows the plow blade to move through the soil with less horsepower than a static blade and cites other benefits such as speed of installation, effective placement of fabric in the ground and minimal soil disturbance. Blades are available for standard geotextile fabric and wire-backed fabric.

The Ditch Witch vibratory plow silt fence attachments can be installed at the factory or dealership on several of the company’s power units.

NPDES Permit Program
Water pollution degrades surface waters making them unsafe for drinking, fishing, swimming and other activities. As authorized by the Clean Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls water pollution by regulating point sources that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States.

Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic system or do not have a surface discharge do not need an NPDES permit; however, industrial, municipal and other facilities must obtain permits if their discharges go directly to surface waters. In most cases, the NPDES permit program is administered by authorized states.

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