Features

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

NASSCO (National Association of Sewer Service Companies) closed out an eventful and successful 2012 marked by continued growth in membership and impressive advances in the organization’s educational programs.

The American Bottom, or Bottoms, is a Southern Illinois area of 175-square miles in the flood plain of the Mississippi River, protected from flooding by a system of levees and canals. The cities in the American Bottom, such as Granite City, IL (population 30,000), have to contend with seasonally high, fluctuating groundwater, which can have a disastrous effect on underground facilities like sewers.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

The Pipe Line Contractors Association (PLCA) is closing out an active 2012 with members busy and labor agreements in place with the unions representing the four crafts engaged in pipeline construction.

Rita Tubb, Managing Editor

Underground Construction and Pipeline & Gas Journal’s 2013 survey figures indicate 116,837 miles of pipelines are planned and under construction worldwide. Of these, 83,806 represent projects in the planning worldwide design phase while 33,031 reflect various stages of construction.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Ohio-based H&H Enterprises is a directional drilling contractor specializing in making difficult installations, most of them in hard rock.

These days, much of the company’s work is in energy shale fields of the Northeastern United States, making road, river and stream crossings on segments of pipeline routes where open-cut construction is not feasible or practical, says Jason Hockran, H&H vice-president/owner.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

As the new year began, construction was nearing completion for 800 miles of fiber optic cable that will comprise the central segment of the state of Maryland’s One Maryland Broadband Network (OMBN) project. Ultimately, this project will create a comprehensive high-speed broadband fiber-optic network to connect more than 1,000 institutional and community facilities throughout the state.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

In the past decade, many positive steps have been taken to reduce accidental damage to underground utilities, yet construction crews still hit buried pipe and cable on a regular basis, causing service outages, work delays and sometimes serious injuries and death.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

In Saskatoon in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, Sunbelt’s task was to install and operate a temporary bypass for a 1,010-foot-long segment of 84-inch diameter sewer interceptor while it was rehabilitated with cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) liner.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

A new breed of pipeline “pig” has arrived in the United States.

“Pigging” to clean pipelines is an accepted procedure used by utility pipeline owners. The process is relatively simple: a device (pig) is inserted into a pipe where pressure forces it through the pipe, scraping the inside sidewalls and carrying debris to an exit point out of the pipe. A variety of pig designs are available.

NASSCO, the National Association of Sewer Service Companies, recently conducted its first-ever Pipeline Assessment Certification Program (PACP) course in Spanish. Held in Bogotá, Colombia, on Oct. 17-18, the instruction included the recently-translated PACP manual and training materials.

Syndicate content