Frequent Challenges For Winter Ocean Drilling In Maine

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | June 2012, Vol. 67 No. 6

“To do that, we’ve had to get more creative in the marketplace since 2008,” he continued. “It should be no surprise that prices for work have changed in our industry with heavy competition and contractors who have been willing to cut prices. Despite the challenges we’ve kept focused on our markets of water, sewer and natural gas, all of which have been excellent industries to be involved in. Water and sewer infrastructures in New England are among of the oldest in the country, continually needing upgrades regardless of the economy. And natural gas has been so cheap in comparison to other fuels that it’s been in high demand. Overall, the course we set in the early years and the risks we took have paid off big during this period.”

ETTI’s sister company, Enterprise Electric has been in business 45 years, and Enterprise Designs is a two-year-old landscape/hardscape company.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

ETTI, (207) 353-5000, www.hdd-etti.com
Ditch Witch, (800) 654-6481, www.ditchwitch.com
Railhead, (888) 313-7455, http://railhead.com

How To Survive A Recession? Refuse to Participate

ETTI President Scott Kelly said he often is asked how his company has continued to grow during a serious recession.

“My answer is we have leaned on our people,” he said. “From the start I’ve told all our employees that I’m choosing not to participate in the economic downturn, and we would accomplish that by a heavy emphasis on training, efficiency and utilizing technology to continue to be profitable.”

ETTI people give 100 percent each day, said Kelly.

That has gotten us through many tough spots,” he continued. “We accessed every facet of the business to cut waste, challenged our employees, shared financial data, set goals and maintain transparency from top to bottom in order to get everyone involved with ideas and decisions. We hire the absolutely best people in our industry, hold everyone accountable and establish mandatory employee goals each season.”

Kelly said the company also avoids poorly-designed projects or high-risk jobs without the financial return to cover the risks.

“Too many companies we see take huge risks for really cheap numbers and many have to pay a high price for the gamble, including bankruptcy,” he concluded.