Future Role Of Natural Gas And Shale Revolution Dominate At P&GJ’s 2010 Pipeline Opportunities Conference

P&GJ’s 2010 Pipeline Opportunities Conference
By Rita Tubb, Managing Editor | June 2010 Vol. 65 No. 6

Wright said, “The carbon-trading industry will be used to push wind turbines, solar, ethanol, biodiesel etc., as viable national scale solutions for energy generation, which they are not. They will not be pushing natural gas although it will be required as a power backup for these unreliable installations.”
“The people pushing the carbon trading scheme are not on our side,” she warned.

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In the following session, Vivek Kashyap, Manager, Welsun Tubular LLC, focused on future prospects for pipeline construction. One of the slides Kashyap shared depicted the miles of pipeline to be added through 2014 in the U.S. and Canada. “Regions with growing unconventional production will experience a higher portion of infrastructure development,” he said,

Also of interest to attendees was a slide showing a $3-4.5 million per mile cost for the construction of 30-42-inch diameter natural gas pipeline.

Kashyap suggested that pipeline construction costs were likely to decline through 2010 before again resuming an upward trend.

Luncheon keynote speaker Hal Kvisle, president and CEO of TransCanada Corporation, gave an upbeat outlook on his company’s plans for the Alaska Gas Pipeline and reported that the FERC had just approved the open season for the multibillion-dollar project that TransCanada is proposing to build with its partner ExxonMobil. He also discussed his company’s frustration with the lack of action in the Mackenzie Valley pipeline proposal, which has been in the regulatory stage in Canada for more than six years.

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In the Alaskan Natural Gas Pipeline session that followed, TransCanada’s Tony Palmer, vice president, Alaska Development, explained that in approving the open season, the FERC recommended that TransCanada immediately open its data room to allow prospective bidders adequate time to review "needed information," such as costs and fees and that certain revisions to its plan comply with the Commission’s Standards of Conduct.

Palmer said TransCanada and ExxonMobil plan to use the results of the open season being held between April 30 and July 30 to decide whether the project would be a 1,700-mile pipeline from the North Slope to the province of Alberta or an 800-mile line bringing North Slope production to Valdez, Alaska.