government

Stephen Barlas, Washington Editor

Anyone looking for an acknowledgement in the new FERC strategic plan that the commission is focused on expanding pipeline infrastructure need not waste his time reading the 50-page document FERC Chairman Jon Wellinghoff issued in mid-October.

Stephen Barlas, Washington Editor

Members of Congress are raising concerns about the prospective failure of cities and counties to spend appropriated stimulus funds for wastewater and drinking water projects, a concern top Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) officials say is justified.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

This December brings one of the most disconcerting periods we’ve ever faced as an industry. There are so many factors impacting the underground infrastructure market that it is hard to grasp all the implications, let alone find solid direction for which to set course in 2010.

Stephen Barlas, Washington Editor

A Senate climate change bill passed in early November by the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee will probably be pushed aside by a version more acceptable to Republicans and moderate Democrats.

During the 2008 national elections, there was much rhetoric about leadership. Unfortunately, in regards to the energy industry, that leadership has failed miserably with no indication of sanity any time soon.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Most major American cities today face multiple challenges to provide basic water and sanitary services.

Pipeline and other construction industries are pressing the federal government to make it easier for projects to pass muster with the Endangered Species Act.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has made available comprehensive reports and data on water enforcement in all 50 states.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

I read recently that a bipartisan group of lawmakers is proposing to raise about $10 billion a year for the rehabilitation of sewer and water systems. The funding sources?

Stephen Barlas, Washington Editor

The Senate Appropriations Committee is likely to approve a $3.6 billion for the Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds in fiscal 2010, which begins Oct. 1.

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