HDD

Dennis Shumard, P.E., MASCE, and Pat Moravits, BRH-Garver Construction

One of the challenges facing municipalities in the replacement of failing pipelines is that many of these pipelines are located in developed and populated areas.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

A horizontal directional drilling (HDD) installation completed last summer under the Sabine River and nearby swamplands is believed to be the longest ever made at 11,065 feet.

HDD Rigs from TT Technologies, Toro, Vermeer, Ditch Witch, Barbco, American Augers and Universal HDD.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

There was a time, back in the 90s, when the horizontal directional drilling market was a huge segment of the annual Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition. Since then, UCT has grown to truly encompass all aspects of the underground marketplace with construction and rehabilitation of sewer and water systems topping the list.

With the advent of new construction technologies comes the need for proven field tests to advance their use. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) using ductile iron pipe, first introduced in 1994, is a method of installing the pipe underground without digging a trench.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

Despite pockets of negativity, the majority of horizontal directional drilling contractors continue to enjoy a robust business atmosphere for 2013, and most expect that environment to continue for the foreseeable future.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) continues to solve problems for utility owners and operators by completing difficult installations of underground infrastructure that many times can be addressed by no other method of construction.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

The Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is reviewing a draft of a proposed Standard Specification for Horizontal Directional Drilling which would ensure quality trenchless installations of underground pipelines and conduits.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

In a part of the country where rocky soils make underground construction difficult, Maine contractor Enterprise Trenchless Technologies, Inc. (ETTI) has built a solid reputation for successfully completing challenging horizontal directional drilling installations, many beneath bodies of water.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Ohio-based H&H Enterprises is a directional drilling contractor specializing in making difficult installations, most of them in hard rock.

These days, much of the company’s work is in energy shale fields of the Northeastern United States, making road, river and stream crossings on segments of pipeline routes where open-cut construction is not feasible or practical, says Jason Hockran, H&H vice-president/owner.

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