IPR, EcoCast Thwart Threat Of Sewer Collapse

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | July 2012, Vol. 67, No. 7

Banchetti said physical properties of EcoCast, such as very high compressive strength, extremely high modulus of elasticity and very high bond strengths were matched to the material’s ability to flow through long lengths of pipe, work in a wide range of temperatures and to cure quickly.

The liner’s initial cure occurs in a matter of hours. Once the liner has initially cured, the Anti-Microbial System coating is applied to the pipe’s surface. Full flow may then be released within 24 hours of AMS application.

Right people, right product

Project Manager Gary Sherill and Technical Director Steve Henning played key roles in the successful completion of the project, said Banchetti.

Joe Cutillo, IPR president and chief executive officer, said that even though the project was in a very difficult location -- both for traffic control and pipe depth -- and performed during the hottest drought in the history of Texas, IPR personnel produced an end product that exceeded all expectations.

“Because IPR has the ability to perform every major rehabilitation technique in-house,” said Cutillo, “we believe it allows us to provide clients with the best possible technology for each particular project or site situation.”

The city of Houston’s Tajadod said utility staff members were aware of the new EcoCast product and method of installation.

“When the opportunity to use it presented itself, we were able to work with IPR on this project,” he said. “We created a change order because of the change in the scope of work, but did not have to increase the contract price. The completed work is a benefit to the community.”

Information from IPR identifies EcoCast as the first “green” geopolymer liner in the industry. It is designed to stick and adhere to virtually any surface; unlike traditional cement mortars, the geopolymer is capable of bonding and building to great thicknesses. It is an engineered, 100-percent, fully-manufactured product with no added non-contributing fillers. It is used for restoring concrete, brick, or corrugated metal storm and sewer pipes and is particularly effective for large-diameter pipe applications.

The city of Houston’s wastewater collection system contains more than 6,250 miles of sewer pipelines in sizes from six to 144-inches in diameter, with over 130,000 manholes. Sewer depths range from two to 80 feet. As in most systems this size, the threat that a large, severely deteriorated sewer line could cause a collapse at a major intersection or highway is common.