January WaterWorks News: California supply, Pennsylvania American acquisitions, Australian water outlook and more

January 2010 Vol. 65 No. 1

Work begins on California water supply pipeline
California American Water has begun work on a pipeline in Del Rey Oaks that will help to address water supply issues on the Monterey Peninsula, where residents face threats of severe rationing from the state, which has placed strict limits on the community’s primary water supply, the Carmel River.

The pipeline is one component of an ambitious Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) project, which captures excess winter flows from the Carmel River and delivers them to the groundwater basin in Seaside, where the additional water will be available for withdrawal during the dry, summer months, while also helping to recharge the basin.

California American Water is charged by the state to come up with additional water supply of 11,285 acre feet per year to replace current pumping from the Carmel River and the Seaside Basin. A project to accomplish this, which includes a desalination facility, is currently under review by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC).

The addition of the new half-mile, 30-inch diameter pipeline will allow the full, permitted potential of excess Carmel River water to be captured and injected into the basin in the wintertime. Once the new pipeline is complete, it is estimated an average of 900 acre-feet per year of ASR water will be stored in the basin.

Pennsylvania American Water acquires three municipal water systems
Pennsylvania American Water, a wholly owned subsidiary of American Water, has acquired three water systems from municipal authorities in north central and western Pennsylvania. The combined purchase price of the newly acquired systems, which serve a total of nearly 600 people in Clearfield, Centre and Washington counties, is approximately $935,000.

In Clearfield County, Pennsylvania American Water purchased the assets of the Wallaceton Municipal Authority, which is adjacent to the company’s Philipsburg water system. According to Pennsylvania American Water President Kathy L. Pape, the acquisition provides a long-term solution for the Wallaceton community, which faced a Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) consent order over water quality concerns with the existing source of supply.