JEA Takes Lead In Proactive Sewer, Water Maintenance

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | September 2009 Vol. 64 No. 9

These reports are made by JEA's Environmental Services Department. Reports include the location of the SSE or SSO, name of the surface water body if applicable, date and time of the incident, the initial suspected cause, estimated volume involved, and steps taken during the incident and subsequent to it. The FDEP makes decisions as to any other notifications that are needed for the specific incident. In cases that pose a potential danger, warning signs are posted as appropriate to the incident. Records of each incident are retained in the PCAN data base. The department uses an online PowerPoint training course that helps first responders estimate overflow volume.

JEA's Environmental Services Department conducts monthly quality control checks on all events to ensure all events and agency notifications are documented. A quarterly meeting is held to review and evaluate notification processes for all reportable events during the previous quarter. This meeting includes JEA, city of Jacksonville's Environmental Resource Management Department and FDEP.

The scope of Six Sigma impact extends far beyond SSO and SSE responses. Kelly describes several other initiatives identified from data analysis:

Other initiatives
The "Pop Top" manhole inspection program is designed to detect potential problems and to take corrective action before a SSO or SSE occurs. Targeting high risk areas by using JEA geographic information system (GIS), in a period of one year 27,747 manholes were inspected by the program and more than 3,000 were repaired.

Rehabilitation of manholes is made with fiberglass liners and polyurethane spray. When conditions dictate, manholes are replaced.

JEA implements an aggressive gravity line inspection and repair program that includes scheduled cleaning of pipes and sewer line replacement.

For many pipe rehabilitation and replacement projects, trenchless construction technologies are utilized. Between 2000 and 2007, more than 280 miles of gravity flow mains were replaced by pipebursting at a cost of more than $200 million. In the same period, more than 50 miles of pipe were lined by cured in place pipe (CIPP) procedures at a cost of more than $20 million.

The authority maintains contracts for CIPP and pipebursting for short term response situations.

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