July WaterWorks News: Rate hikes spur opposition, water main causes cave-in, stimulus funds arriving slowly

July 2010 Vol. 65 No. 7
A scene in Gainesville after a water main burst flooded a street and caused a cave-in.

To date, five initial vadose zone recharge wells and associated facilities have been installed at the SSWRP site. In addition to the recharge well system, the associated infrastructure, consisting of 4,700 linear feet of 20-inch pipeline, well delivery manifold, a floating reservoir cover and pressure control stations to recharge an estimated 2.2 MGD of Class A+ reclaimed water, was constructed. LAN provided project management, planning, civil engineering and construction management services for the project.

“The award is a testament to the project’s contribution to our community and recognition of the value we bring to our clients,” said LAN project manager Floyd L. Marsh. Marsh is the water resources manager and practice leader for the Phoenix office of LAN.

Greater Boston water pipe failure restored
At about 10 a.m. on May 1, a collar connecting two sections of 10-foot wide pipe ruptured in Weston, MA, disrupting the connection between the MetroWest Water Supply Tunnel and the City Tunnel. The rupture worsened as the afternoon progressed, eventually resulting in the loss of access to clean water from the Quabbin and Wachusett Reservoirs for approximately two million residents of 31 cities and towns, including Boston.

Massachusetts Water Resources Authority Executive Director Frederick Laskey called the break "catastrophic." The rupture worsened as the afternoon progressed, eventually resulting in the loss of access to clean water from the Quabbin and Wachusett Reservoirs for approximately two million residents of 31 cities and towns, including Boston. By evening, the MWRA had activated the backup water system, which was drawing water from the Sudbury Reservoir, Chestnut Hill Reservoir, and Spot Pond Reservoir. Because water from these older surface reservoirs is not treated, the MWRA issued a boil order for the affected communities.

Repairs began on the damaged pipe early in the day on May 2. By that same afternoon, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick stated that clean drinking water could be flowing again "in days, not weeks." Service was restored in the early morning of May 4. An investigation is ongoing to determine the cause of the rupture.

Diminishing water supply, aging infrastructure will impact NJ state economy
Speaking at a recent business roundtable, New Jersey American Water President John Bigelow said that in the Garden State, a diminishing natural water supply and aging infrastructure will impact business and the state for the foreseeable future.