Keeping The Sewer Running In Saskatoon

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | January 2013, Vol. 68, No. 1

The purpose of every pipe bypass project is to construct a temporary pipeline around a section of pipe that is being repaired or replaced; however, no two bypasses are exactly alike -- each is different and has its own special challenges.

Sunbelt Rentals is a national turnkey provider of pumps and equipment for large water and sewer line bypass projects. A project during the past winter was far removed from the nearest Sunbelt location in Denver, CO.

In Saskatoon in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan, Sunbelt’s task was to install and operate a temporary bypass for a 1,010-foot-long segment of 84-inch diameter sewer interceptor while it was rehabilitated with cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) liner. The bypass was put in place in January and February 2012 and bypass components were removed in April after lining was completed and flow returned to the interceptor, the largest sewer interceptor in the city.

Project owner was the city of Saskatoon. Sunbelt assisted prime contractor Insituform in the construction of the sewer bypass by supplying a setup superintendent and personnel to operate and maintain the bypass.

“The geographic location and harsh winter climate brought many challenges,” said Ladd Gould, Sunbelt national strategic account manager.

Careful planning was the key to avoiding problems, Gould said. “Pipes and pumps would have to be kept from freezing,” he said. “Subzero temperatures became the biggest concern during advanced planning. Every detail had to be planned and scrutinized to mitigate any chance of failure.”

Getting equipment into Canada also required careful planning.

“Before submitting a bid, Sunbelt hired a consultant to account for the foreign tax implications guaranteeing the bypass bid cost for our client, Insituform, would be covered,” Gould continued. “To calculate import and local taxes, each piece of bypass equipment was categorized. Each and every loose nut and bolt was taken into account, making this a lengthy process. While this was under way, Sunbelt personnel who would be working on the project were interviewed by an immigration attorney to avoid any entry issues into Canada.”

Record cold
Two weeks prior to Sunbelt’s arrival in Saskatoon, the temperature dropped to a record low -36 degrees F. However, careful planning ensured Sunbelt personnel were ready for the extreme cold.

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