Manholes Rehabilitation: Sometimes Misunderstood, Yet Key Infrastructure Solution

First In A Three-Part Series
By Gerhard “Gerry” P. Muenchmeyer, P.E. NASSCO Technical Director | September 2011, Vol. 66 No. 9

Was the wrong product installed or improperly applied? Was the structure prepared incorrectly for long-term product performance? What should be changed to ensure long-term performance? Are there recommended repair techniques that work? How should the new product be designed in a manhole? How is a product designed, using industry appropriate design equations? What does it mean when a product is termed structural versus non-structural? What testing should be performed to verify proper application? Should the level of applicator training be improved through advanced training, education and certification? Should third party inspection, by certified inspectors, become part of the technology or product application process?

These and many more questions will be answered by industry professional in parts two and three of this series in subsequent issues of Underground Construction magazine.

In August, the next article will focus on available manhole rehabilitation technologies and correct application and use. It will define the best practices for manhole rehabilitation including interviews with technology providers, engineers and municipalities to define what is necessary for manhole rehabilitation success.

In September, design approach for manhole rehabilitation will focus on what soil and groundwater forces act on an existing manhole and the proposed rehabilitation technology and what design approaches apply to manholes.

Editor’s Note:
References for this article include: Manhole Assessment Certification Program, copyright © NASSCO Version 6.0 June 2010 Rev 6-29-10; American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). (2009). "Manhole Inspection and Rehabilitation"; and ASCE Manuals and Reports on Engineering Practice No. 92, Second Edition.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
NASSCO, (410) 486-3500, www.nassco.org

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