Many Factors Essential In Completion Of Ohio Gas Main Replacement Project

Planning, Cooperation & Carefully Controlled Logistics
By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | November 2013, Vol. 68 No. 11

The river split the project in half with east and west segments each containing approximately 4,000 feet of new pipe. Work proceeded on both parts at the same time with each segment having its own dedicated crews. DeCraene said soil on the west side was sand and gravel with more clay on the east side. Typically, soils changed around existing utilities. A short rock formation was encountered on the west side. Crews installed an average of 60 feet of pipe per day.

Digging was done with large excavators – John Deere 200 and 350 Series models. Support equipment included rubber-tire side booms, rubber-tire loaders, tandem dump trucks to haul spoil, boom trucks and pipe trailers.

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To minimize any compaction issues, the pipe was padded with sand and a flowable fill was used to the bottom of the pavement. Paving then was restored. Flow fill and paving was subcontracted to Decker Construction.

“High water issues only came into play when we had to go under large storm sewers,” said DeCraene. “Then we used approved shoring equipment, trench boxes, hydraulic shoring, electric pumps and large generators.

“Crews were not allowed to string pipe along the trench path, so pipe sections had to be hauled to the job site from two storage areas, one on site, the second near the project area. Also each day, we had to remove all the equipment from the job site and steel plate the trench to maintain traffic, especially on the east side of the project in the residential areas. The west side of the project was more commercial and we were able to install steel plate and leave some of the equipment on site.”

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Heading off problems
Any problems encountered regarding the proposed location of the main were addressed on site with the gas company and InfraSource making suggestions relative to constructability, said DeCraene. Traffic control and public safety was performed by subcontractor Area Wide Protective, whose crews addressed traffic congestion by posting detour routes and alerts ahead of construction and maintaining them throughout the project.

The HDD river crossing made at the beginning of the project and was subcontracted to the Mears Group, also a Quanta company. DeCraene said the initial bore plan required alignment and depth changes.