Massive Spincast Culvert Rehab For INDOT

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | September 2012, Vol. 67 No. 9

Among its many on-going highway improvement projects, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) is renovating failing culverts that are critical elements in the drainage systems that protect state and interstate highways.

Along a 63-mile segment of Interstate 74 between Indianapolis and the Illinois state line is the largest culvert pipe lining project ever undertaken by (INDOT) in terms of number of culverts and dollar value of the contract, said Karl Bates, project manager/estimator with Indiana Reline, contractor for the project.

Whenever possible, culverts beneath major highways are repaired and renovated, rather than replaced. Excavation to install a large-diameter culvert beneath an interstate highway is costly, time consuming and requires rerouting traffic during construction.

Indiana Reline currently is working on a $4.2 million INDOT contract to reline 43 ranging in diameter from 24 to 114 inches along this section of Interstate 74. Subsequently, three 90-inch and one 96-inch culverts designed to be relined by cured-in-place pipe were changed to centrifugally-cast-concrete pipe (CCCP) via value-added engineering.

Various lining methods are being used, depending on condition and inside diameters of the pipes, said Bates.

Thirteen large-diameter culverts are being lined with a CCCP liner, the first time this product and process have been used in the state, said Bates. Centri-Pipe is the product being used.

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Centrifugally-cast pipe

“Three of the culverts represent the largest Centri-Pipe installations in the world,” he pointed out. “They are large, arched corrugated metal pipe (CMP) structures with round equivalents of 114 for one pipe and 108 inches for the other two. The culverts had been installed in the 1950s and had various issues including deformation, severe denting and rusted inverts. All were below seven to 10 feet of cover.”

The Centri-Pipe process uses a remote-controlled spincaster to apply a concrete coating inside the old pipe, said Bates. The spincaster travels at a speed to insure the uniform thickness of concrete as specified by each installation. The device can be started and stopped as needed without leaving joints or gaps, resulting in a seamless, high strength, fully structural pipe without reducing the pipe’s capacity.