May WaterWorks News: Dayton water projects, Navajo gain clean water, Aqua replacing main, new CCTV tool

May 2010 Vol. 65 No. 5
  • Clark County received nearly $83,000 to line Garden Acre sewers and install manhole dishes to eliminate overflows into the Mad River;
  • Montgomery County received roughly $175,000 to stabilize sewer and water lines exposed at seven stream crossings and replace three sewer lines. It also received $150,000 to line 880 feet of sewer lines along Lesher Drive in Kettering; and
  • Riverside received $20,600 to replace drains in the city maintenance building with oil separators, $122,000 to remove trash, overgrowth and pollutants from Lorella pond and $47,300 to build a new salt storage barn that will improve water quality by eliminating run-off caused by outdoor storage.

Navajo Nation to get clean drinking water
Reclamation's Four Corners Construction Office began survey work for the western portion of the Navajo Gallup Water Supply Project on March 15. This work will establish the topography necessary to design the water supply pipeline in New Mexico and Arizona. Approximately 350 photo panels will be set up along roads in New Mexico from Fruitland to Shiprock; from Shiprock to Gallup; from Twin Lakes to Crown Point; and from Yah-ta-Hey to Window Rock, AZ. GPS survey equipment will be used to locate all the panels, which will then be photographed from an airplane flying at approximately 3,600 feet above the ground.

The Navajo Gallup Water Supply Project (NGWSP) was authorized for construction by Public Law 111-11 as a major component of the Navajo Nation San Juan River Basin Water Rights Settlement in New Mexico. Once completed, the NGWSP will provide a reliable municipal, industrial and domestic water supply to Navajo Nation communities, the city of Gallup, NM, Window Rock and Fort Defiance in AZ, the Navajo Agricultural Products Industry, and a portion of the Jicarilla Apache Nation Reservation. These areas currently rely on a rapidly depleting groundwater supply that is of poor quality and inadequate to meet the current and future needs.

The NGWSP will divert a total of 37,764 acre-feet of water annually from the San Juan River and the existing Cutter Reservoir, treat the water at two water treatment plants, and deliver water to the cities and chapters via 260 miles of pipeline and 24 pumping plants. The project is designed to provide for the water needs of approximately 250,000 people in these Native American communities by the year 2040.