May WaterWorks News: Dayton water projects, Navajo gain clean water, Aqua replacing main, new CCTV tool

May 2010 Vol. 65 No. 5

Providence Water Supply Board acts decisively for proactive water conservation
Itron Inc. announced that Providence Water Supply Board (PWSB), which serves approximately 73,000 retail Rhode Island customers, is deploying an advanced leak detection system from Itron. With over 870 miles of water distribution lines, PWSB will be able to proactively monitor its system for leaks with MLOG acoustic leak detection technology from Itron.

PWSB deployed more than 8,400 MLOG sensors in early March, starting in North Providence and expanding into the remainder of its retail territory. PWSB received partial funding for the project from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for its focus on water infrastructure and conservation. Progressive water utilities like PWSB are deploying advanced leak detection solutions to reduce water losses, lower associated pumping and treatment costs and prevent major leak events.

Situated in New England, where the water supply is currently abundant, PWSB recognizes the importance of water conservation. Since the early ‘90s, PWSB has focused on educating customers on their consumption and on managing their distribution system infrastructure. PWSB’s distribution system is more than 100 years old and benefits from a program of ongoing infrastructure improvements to ensure the reliable delivery of clean drinking water to its customers.

MLOG sensors, capable of hearing a pinhole leak, transmit leak data to a drive-by collector. The leak locations are identified through an online software application, which are then investigated by PWSB. This allows the utility to proactively monitor their distribution system and mitigate costly water leaks.

Water main project begins in Troy
A water main replacement project to stop 500,000-plus gallons of city-owned water from leaking into the ground on a daily basis got under way in early March in Troy, MT, according to The Western News.

Contractors plan to replace eight-inch water mains on Yaak Street and Fourth Street, and 10-inch mains on Third Street.

Approximately 800 feet of 12-inch pipe will also be installed to loop the city well to the water main on Highway 2. Construction is slated to continue through the end of May.

The report further states that stimulus funding and appropriations for this second phase of the project to replace the city’s water distribution system costs almost $1.77 million. About $1.49 million came from grants and $277,500 from of a 20-year, low-interest loan.