municipal

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

As Michigan’s largest utility provider, Consumers Energy provides natural gas and electric service to 6.6 million of the state’s 10 million residents, and the company’s safety and damage prevention efforts must address multiple challenges

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

The question invariably is asked after severe weather or other disasters knocks out electrical power and communications services: “Why don’t they put those overhead lines underground where they’re protected?”
That question has been asked many times in many places over the past few years as heavy winter storms, tornadoes and hurricanes have affected much of the country, knocking out power, communications and other vital services.

Carlos Montes, Trenchless Technology Center

There was a time when engineers designed structures to last for eternity. Since the beginning of mankind, civilizations have desired to create an enduring legacy through their architecture. Engineers from ancient civilizations such as Egypt, Greece and Rome did not build their fabulous structures and monuments with the intention of having them repaired every 50 years.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

A major sewer rehabilitation program is under way in the city of Indianapolis addressing a backlog of structural repair and inflow and infiltration issues.

Keith Hanks, senior environmental engineer for the Wastewater Conveyance Engineering Division for the city of Los Angeles, CA, retired from the industry effective Sept. 21.

The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) has approved the longitudinal installation of large diameter, corrugated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe for storm water drainage systems.

Under a settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced recently, Miami-Dade County in Florida has agreed to invest in major upgrades to its wastewater treatment plants and wastewater collection and transmission systems in order to eliminate sanitary sewer overflows.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently released results of a survey showing that $384 billion in improvements are needed for the nation’s drinking water infrastructure through 2030 for systems to continue providing safe drinking water to 297 million Americans.

In April, nearly 200 water leaders from the private and public sector joined together in Washington, DC, as part of the Water Matters! Fly In, sponsored by the American Water Works Association and the Water Environment Federation urging Congress to vote for legislation that addresses the nation’s water infrastructure and confronts mounting affordability concerns.

Erin Boudreaux, Hobas Pipe USA

Since the first building in Houston, TX, was air conditioned in 1923, media has often dubbed the city, “the air conditioning capital of the world.” With summer temperatures often exceeding 100 degrees Fahrenheit, it’s no wonder that Houstonians are concerned about reliable electricity to keep the units running.

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