NASSCO

Gerhard “Gerry” P. Muenchmeyer, P.E., NASSCO Technical Director

The nation’s failing sewer collection system infrastructure encompasses main pipelines, lateral sewers and manholes. There exist over 20 million manholes in the U.S. of which over four million are older than 50 years and over five million are 30 to 50 years old.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

The sanitary sewer rehabilitation industry -- especially organizations involved in cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) lining -- are evaluating potential ramifications, if any, of the designation last month of styrene as a “reasonably anticipated carcinogen.”

Matt Timberlake, President, Ted Berry Trenchless Technologies LLC

Pipe bursting, like many technologies today, has its own set of lingo or jargon which often times makes it difficult to understand for someone new to the industry or without a lot of direct experience with the technology.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Organizations in the cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) industry are seriously concerned about a recommendation before the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to designate styrene as a “reasonably anticipated carcinogen,” implying that it could be a cause of cancer in humans.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Members of the NASSCO Lateral Committee continue to refine a document to provide a comprehensive overview of lateral and main-lateral connection repair and sealing technologies.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Rehabilitation of failing sanitary sewer systems is a high priority for many cities in the United States with major projects under way relining and replacing aging and failing mains.

The RehabZone posted record attendance at the 2011 Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exposition (UCT) held Jan. 24-27 in Houston.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

This past year (2010) was a busy and eventful period for NASSCO (the National Association of Sewer Service Companies).

There were many highlights, said NASSCO President Brad Dutruch, including:

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

For the first time in decades, Irv Gemora doesn’t have a “regular” job to go to each day.

After retiring as executive director of NASSCO (National Association of Sewer Service Companies) last August, Gemora helped with the transition of the association’s new executive director, Ted DeBoda, and he remains on the payroll as a consultant until February.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Ted DeBoda took over as executive director of NASSCO (National Association of Sewer Service Companies) in August 2010 and has settled in quickly, managing on-going association programs and looking ahead to the challenges of the future.

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