News

Dale M. Smith, P.E. Collinsville Branch Manager, Geotechnology Inc.

When faced with a project that is 133 miles long, spans two states and dozens of counties and features a tight schedule, logistics can be a serious foe. Communicating to many design team members and being responsive to the many challenges encountered in the field only complicate the efforts to successfully complete a project on time and on budget. Developing organizational and coordination skills into a serious strength and planning appropriately are paramount to operating efficiently, performing well and providing quality results.

Traci Read, Senior Editor

When horizontal directional drilling (HDD) professionals discuss the size of an HDD rig, they usually refer to the maximum pullback force the unit can develop. The most common industry standard for a large directional drilling unit is defined as having a minimum of 100,000 pounds of pullback force. In addition to pullback, the most common specifications used to categorize HDD equipment are rotary torque of drill stem, rotation speed and the size of drill pipe.

Rita Tubb, Managing Editor

As of mid-year, international/offshore reports show planned pipeline miles remain higher than actual pipeline construction mileage. Figures show the international sector accounts for 81,752 miles of crude oil, natural gas and refined products pipelines under construction and planned. Of these, 50,355 miles represent pipelines in the feasibility and front end engineering design phase while 31,215 miles account for pipelines in various phases of construction.

Robert Carpenter, Editor

In this issue, Managing Editor Rita Tubb provides a round-up of oil, gas and product pipeline construction currently under way or projected around the world. It’s a reduced number, as expected, compared to recent years. However, it is a very realistic number as the “pipe-in-the-sky” projects that are inevitably thrown about during boom times have been dropped. The remaining projects are considered solid with a strong chance of coming to fruition. The numbers lead us to anticipate a reasonably healthy pipeline market going forward.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

A small, high-tech Ohio business has developed technology that monitors temperature readings along a full segment of pipe during the curing of the CIPP (cured-in-place-pipe) lining process.

The procedure uses sensors strung by cable inside the pipe to be relined before the liner is inserted into the pipe, explains Jack Conte, president and chief executive officer of Zia Systems LLC.

Stephen Tait

Mears Group Inc. completed in April a 7,400-foot horizontal directional drilling bore in Jacksonville, FL, a design-build project that allows a regional energy producer to expand its natural gas pipeline to serve new facilities. To complete the project, Mears drilled a 7,400-foot pilot hole 130-feet beneath the St. Johns River bottom to install the 16-inch steel pipe. It is an essential link in a 50-mile pipeline that ends at the Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA’s) Greenland Energy Center.

Construction on TransCanada Corporation’s long-distance, large-diameter C$5.2 billion Keystone crude oil pipeline reaching from Canada’s Alberta oil fields to markets in the U.S. Midwest is grinding to completion after more than two years of intensive construction activity.

Congress may vote during the lame duck session after the November congressional elections on the biggest pipeline safety bill since the 2002 amendments established integrity management programs for distribution, transmission and hazardous liquid pipelines. Then again, a major reform bill may be delayed until the next Congress.

Tyler Henning

The McElroy PolyHorse can reduce labor expenses, provide a less hazardous working environment and enhance productivity up to 150 percent in some instances. The productivity tool can be used with 3-inch IPS through 20-inch OD (90 mm to 500 mm) polyethylene pipe.

New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) announced Oct. 22 that it has submitted a filing with the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities to continue its Accelerated Infrastructure Program (AIP II) and expedite a number of its previously planned replacement, reinforcement and expansion projects. NJNG is proposing to spend approximately $52.2 million on nine additional capital projects in Monmouth, Ocean and Morris counties.

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