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Norman A. “Norm” Sirna, Sr., passed away on July 31. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Vivian; children Norman “Alex” (Elizabeth) and Santa; and grandchildren James Jr., Jonathan and Nicholas.

Services were held at Hutchens Mortuary in Florissant, MO. Interment was at Calvary Cemetery. Memorials may be made to the charity of donor’s choice.

Robert McCann Kirkpatrick
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U.S. demand for pipe is expected to rise 7.3 percent per year to $63.5 billion in 2018.

Cargill Incorporated, a privately held multinational corporation headquartered in Minnetonka, MN, has agreed to settle allegations that it violated the Clean Water Act at two different large oil storage facilities located in Blair, NE, and Eddyville, IA.

RDX Technologies Corporation, a water treatment and energy technology company, announced the filing of its easements in Ector County, TX, along its fully granted right-of-ways for its pipeline operation located in Odessa, TX.

The Vitrified Clay Pipe Engineering Manual is now available for download on the National Clay Pipe Institute (NCPI) website free of charge at VCP Engineering Manual.

Plains All American Pipeline L.P. announced in August that it will construct the Diamond Pipeline.

The U.S. Department of Energy has completed its environmental review of a $2.2 billion project that will run a 330-mile electric line from Canada to New York City.

Richard (Dick) N. Schantz, of Cedarburg,WI, passed away Sept. 6. He was 71 years old.

C. Vipulanadan, PhD, P.E., professor and director of Center for Innovative Grouting Materials and Technology (CIGMAT) and Texas Hurricane Center for Innovative Technology (THC-IT), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Houston

The Center for Innovative Grouting Materials and Technology’s (CIGMAT) research is focused on energy, water and wastewater infrastructures and pipelines maintenance, environmental issues and developing new smart materials for construction, maintenance and repairs.

Groundwater pumping has produced significant changes in water levels below some parts of the Albuquerque metropolitan area, according to two new reports published by the U.S. Geological Survey.

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