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The American Society of Civil Engineers Pipelines Division held its annual conference in Miami Beach, FL, in August with record attendance of more than 650.

Thompson Pump and Manufacturing Co., a provider of high quality pumps, pumping equipment and engineering expertise, introduces the launch of the Gator Giveaway Sweepstakes at upcoming events.

Driver Pipeline, headquartered in Dallas, TX, has been named the 2012 Natural Gas Business Unit Contractor Safety Award Winner by Kinder Morgan, the largest midstream and the fourth largest energy company (based on combined enterprise value) in North America.

The Freedonia Group's new World Water Infrastructure Equipment market research report states that global demand for water infrastructure equipment will grow to exceed $100 billion by 2016, at a projected growth rate of more than six percent per year.

Rhode Island has taken a "careful, balanced review" toward wind energy that will help pave the way for the successful launch of several new projects, U.S. Senator Jack Reed from the nation’s smallest state told Platts Energy Week, an all-energy news and talk show program.

Charles John Groebner, Sr., the founder and chairman of Groebner & Associates Inc., passed away on June 26 due to complications related to a recent surgery. He was 82 years old.

Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) recently expanded and accelerated its comprehensive research and development program aimed at enhancing current in-line inspection (ILI) tools and developing the next generation of technology to ensure pipeline safety, integrity and reliability.

In 2010–11, major earthquakes hit Chile, Japan and New Zealand, causing significant damage to water system infrastructure. In response to these events, the Water Research Foundation funded project #4408 under the Emerging Opportunities Program to investigate the potential implications of the earthquakes on U.S. water utilities.

In June, a five-year water line replacement project for the city of Pittsburg, KS, was presented to city commissioners by John Bailey, public utilities director. The cost to replace the city’s 100-year old water lines and hydrants is expected to be at least $250,000 annually.

Administration officials significantly underestimated the cost to construction employers of proposed new hiring quotas for federal contractors according to a new analysis released by the Associated General Contractors of America.

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