Panoramic Pipe Inspection For Manholes

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | February 2012, Vol. 67 No. 2

“Unlike a video tape from a conventional pan and rotate camera which only shows the section of view saved at the time of taping, the Ibak Panaramo SI viewer software provides an all-round inspection of the manhole, just as if the inspector were on site with a pan and rotate camera,” said James. “At a desk with a computer and mouse, the user can stop at any position in the manhole, do a 360 degree pan, zoom, perform an image capture and complete the analysis data.”

Simultaneously, an unfolded view of the inner surface of the manhole can be generated which gives a rapid overview of the condition of the structure and enables the user to measure the position and size of objects with the aid of a computer.

Panoramic pipe inspections
For inspections of pipes eight inches in diameter and larger, IPI uses the 3D Optiscanner with thes Ibak Panaramo Rapid View camera inspection system also employing dual-mounted, high-resolution cameras with wide angle lenses. Parallel mounted xenon flashlights are triggered when cameras are activated. Scanned pictures are put together to form 360 degree spherical images. The scanning process can be accomplished both in forward and in reverse directions. As with manhole inspections, image data is transmitted digitally to the inspection van and is available to the operator and saved as a panoramic picture of the entire pipeline and viewer software permits in-the-office inspection of the section of pipe with the same capabilities described for utilizing manhole data.

For long-range pipe inspections, IPI uses the Inuktun VT300 Versatrax crawler/camera system with multi-sensor capability. The system is capable of inspections to distances of 7,000 feet, reducing logistics and deployment time.

“This system,” said James, “has three on-board video cameras with high-intensity LED lighting, can be outfitted with multiple sensors and can be used on round or flat surface applications at a speeds of up to 30 feet per minute. In pipe 12 inches in diameter and larger, sensors in addition to CCTV can be added. Laser scans are used to produce ovality and radius reports for sliplining. A sonar sensor typically is used for fully submerged pipes and siphons. However, underwater laser is one of the newest sensors for providing measurable data in fully-submerged pipes. H2S gas monitoring sensors can be combined in the same inspection, deployed on the same platform, and can be combined in the same inspection deployed on the same platform, and can provide multiple reports from the same footage location not visible to the human eye.”