Pinnacle Finds Niche, Growth In South Carolina

June 2013, Vol. 68, No. 6

“In many cases, HDD is called for by project owners simply because they want to avoid trenching because of the negative social impact of open-cut construction and to avoid the impact it causes to businesses and damage to meticulously-landscaped properties. In addition, HDD often reduces the time needed to complete a project and actually reduces the cost of construction.”

Projects

Most of Pinnacle’s work, Carlson added, is in highly-congested underground utility environments. Subsurface soils typically are sand or clay; rock is rarely encountered in coastal areas.

Projects that illustrate Pinnacle’s range of work include:

• Street lighting -- Earlier in 2012, Pinnacle crews began installing 60,000 feet of street lighting conduit for the Town of Mount Pleasant. Work is along the edge of Highway 17, one of the busiest boulevards in a suburb of metropolitan Charleston. The project was made necessary by a street widening project. To complete the work, Carlson said as many as four crews with three JT2020 HDD units will be needed to install three-inch HDPE conduit. The project is scheduled to be completed in September 2013 with approximately 400 bores ranging in length from 50 to 250-feet, with an average length of 125 feet. The lighting will enhance sidewalks along the street.
• Power upgrade -- Pinnacle used HDD to upgrade SCE&G’s electrical distribution system serving a portion of Sullivan’s Island, one of the most affluent ZIP codes on the east coast. The area overlooks Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie, part of a string of fortifications built to protect Charleston Harbor. Fort Moultrie dates to 1776 with the current structure completed in 1809. The Civil War began at Fort Sumter in 1861.

Pinnacle crews used JT3020, JT2720 and a JT1220 along with compact excavators to install 52,000 feet of two-, 3- and six-inch conduit for single- and three-phase power distribution lines to serve residences, a church and a boat landing.