Pipe Bursting Large Diameter Pipe - Class C Pipe Bursting

8th In A Series From The IPBA
By Matt Timberlake, President, Ted Berry, Trenchless Technologies Team LLC, International Pipe Bursting Association Marketing Committee | December 2011, Vol. 66 No. 12
Class C bursting diagram.

By-pass and isolation of the existing flows is essential to managing a safe and successful project. All details should be determined in advance of any field work including the dry and wet weather flows, where the flows will be isolated to and from, and the layout of the by-pass system and designing it so it does not conflict with the pipe bursting or handling of the new pipe as it is prepared. In most cases, the flows are isolated at least one manhole upstream and downstream of the project. It is not practical with large diameter pipe bursting to restore flows at the end of each shift as is sometimes common with smaller diameter projects.

Connections that are made to large diameter pipes such as service laterals, manhole terminations and connecting two plain end pieces of pipe must be clearly defined in the project specifications and work plan. With HDPE pipe, the ability to fuse in the trench is much more difficult with pipes larger than 18-inches in size and couplings available are most often electrofusion or mechanical types. A number of styles of lateral connections are available from mechanical saddles to Inserta-Tees that allow a PVC sewer lateral to be connected to the new HDPE or PVC mainline. A clear understanding of these connections to the newly installed pipe will reduce the chance of confusion in the field or rework by the contractor.

Class C pipe bursting projects are being successfully completed with greater frequency throughout the U.S. and should be a part of your rehabilitation toolbox.

Do your homework, select a quality project team and go pipe bursting! New pipe, more capacity: for pipe bursting the time is now.


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

IPBA (NASSCO), (410) 486-3500, www.nassco.org

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