Recycling System Designed For Small HDD Rigs

By Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor | September 2013, Vol. 68 No. 9

R2S Solutions, an Arizona research and development company, has introduced a new fluid recycling system designed specifically for horizontal directional drilling equipment with pullback ratings of 50,000 pounds and less.

The truck-mounted CMD-1600 containment mixing deck can process 1,600 gallons of useable drilling fluid and allows HDD operators of this size equipment to operate productively while realizing significant savings in drilling fluid costs, said Slade Ottney, R2S Solutions owner and managing partner.

The new system is available now from the sales division of R2S Solutions and later from distributors as they are established.

Components of the CMD-1600 system mount on the deck of a conventional heavy-duty day cab truck. The clean water tank has a capacity of 1,000 gallons with a bulkhead separating a 200-gallon section for cleaning or mixing. The reclamation tank holds 600 gallons.

The split-screen reclaiming system has de-silter and de-sander cones and produces up to 100 gallons of reclaimed fluid per minute. Tank lids contain fluids so that mud can be transported from job to job. Charge and return connections are positioned at a low level at the rear of the truck.

Layout on the deck provides easy access to the mixing hopper, flow control valves and switch panel. The deck has ample storage space for fluid additives.

Equipment advantages
Ottney cites multiple benefits of the CMD-1600.

“Used in place of other mixing systems currently with drill units in the 17,000 to 50,000-pound pullback class,” he explained, “the CMD-1600 will dramatically lower drilling costs. It allows continuous drilling without sacrificing valuable production time to get more water to mix more mud, or stop drilling to wait for the vac trailer or truck to return from the dump site.”

The reclaiming industry does not offer many choices of smaller reclaimers, he continued, and those available typically are skid or trailer mounted.

“This means the HDD company will have to supply another truck to haul it, a cutting bin, a backhoe and dump truck to load the cuttings, and CDL drivers for each crew,” Ottney stressed. “The utility market that supports these smaller drilling operations does not yield enough to add even one piece of equipment nor for additional labor.”

Switching hats to that of chief operations officer for contractor R Directional Drilling and Underground Technology, Ottney said drilling fluids are a significant cost of every HDD project in a highly-competitive market where controlling costs is essential.