Understanding Environmental Implications Of CIPP Rehab Technology

By Ed Kampbell, P.E. | April 2009 Vol. 64 No. 4
  1. Cure resin system per written curing schedule; and
  2. Release process water to the sewer after per industry standards during/after cool down.

Storm Sewers and Culverts

  1. Cure resin systems per written curing schedule; and
  2. Based upon receiving waterway’s assimilate capabilities:
    1. Discharge water when at ambient air temperature;
    2. Discharge water when styrene concentration is confirmed to be at or below 25 ppm; or
    3. Transport process water to nearest wastewater treatment facility.

Steam Curing
Sanitary Sewers

  1. Cure resin system per written curing schedule; and
  2. Release condensate water directly to receiving sewer while processing.

Storm Sewers and Culverts

  1. Cure resin system per written curing schedule;
  2. Based upon receiving waterway’s assimilative capabilities:
    1. Detain condensate in a lined holding pond until it cools to ambient;
    2. Discharge water when styrene concentration is confirmed to be less than 25 ppm; or
    3. Retrieve condensate by pumping it into the steam generation truck’s reservoir; or
    4. Transport condensate to nearest wastewater treatment facility.

Using the above recommendations, any residual styrene concentrations from a properly cured resin system that are taken into the runoff water from storm events will typically be short lived, in the range of less than 1.0 ppm and pose no significant environmental threat.