Vacmasters Introduces Compact, Powerful System 5000

January 2013, Vol. 68, No. 1

Vacmasters has introduced the new System 5000 air vacuum excavator which combines power and versatility in a compact package mounted on a 33,000 pound gross vehicle weight truck to efficiently make “soft” excavations for potholing, trenching and other types of excavations.

The System 5000 is available now, directly from Vacmasters.

The new model is powered by a six-cylinder, 173-horsepower turbo-charged diesel engine and develops 1,400 cfm vacuum at 15 inches Hg using a four-inch diameter hose. Its compressor is rated at 300 cfm at 220 psi with an air lance, and 300 cfm at 100 psi for air tools such as a jackhammer or a pneumatic tamper. Spoil tank capacity is 500 gallons with hydraulic hoist and full opening rear door.

Within the Vacmasters five-model line of air excavators, the System 5000 fits between the largest unit, System 6000, and the smaller unit, System 4000.

“The System 5000 provides 50 percent more vacuum power than the System 4000 while maintaining a smaller size than the System 6000 to allow operators to get into tighter areas for work,” said Trevor Connolly, Vacmasters vice president of sales and marketing. “The System 5000’s larger spoil tank with a full-opening rear door allows operators to complete work from start to finish in record time making it easier to backfill with denser, wetter type soils.”

Connolly said the new model is designed to fill the needs of the same user categories as other Vacmasters air excavation models.

“Utility contractors, municipalities, gas and pipeline companies as well as engineering or environmental firms will appreciate the features and capabilities of the System 5000,” he continued. “The added power of the vacuum and full-opening rear door feature will allow contractors to undertake larger excavations beyond just small potholes.”

Air advantages
Connolly emphasized air excavation offers several benefits compared to equipment that uses high-pressure water.

Vacmasters, said Connolly, pioneered the development of air technology excavation as a safer, more economical way to pothole, eliminating the risk of personal injury associated with using high-pressure water.

“For example,” he explained, “unlike water, air excavation will not rupture cables or conduct electricity, exposing crew members to injury and owners and operators of equipment to liabilities from the inherent dangers associated with hydro excavation. Excavation with air also eliminates the need to haul off muddy spoils and bring in dry backfill material.”