WaterWorks

The city of Dubuque, IA, has agreed to pay a $205,000 civil penalty and spend an additional $3 million on improvements to its water pollution control plant and sewer collection system over the next three years to settle a series of alleged violations of the federal Clean Water Act.

The city of Omaha, NE, is set to begin a $200 million project to install new infrastructure that will replace old sewer lines, which could mean as much as 2,000 jobs.

Insituform Technologies recently announced that it has been awarded its first stormwater pipeline rehabilitation contract from the Board of County Commissioners, Orange County, FL.

The city of Omaha, NE, is set to begin a $200 million project to install new infrastructure that will replace old sewer lines, which could mean as much as 2,000 jobs.

The Kauai Board of Water Supply has issued a Request for Proposals for a water development project that uses groundbreaking advances in the art of horizontal directional drilling (HDD), while building on existing water development technology in the Hawaiian Islands.

The EPA has awarded $485,000 to the city of Topeka, KS, for improvements to its drinking water and sewer systems. The project is expected to be completed by the summer of 2012.

WERF is now accepting proposals under the cooperative agreement Innovation and Research for Water Infrastructure for the 21st Century. More than $1 million in total funding is available for research that will generate innovative technologies, techniques, and tools to assist or improve sustainable management, operations and maintenance, and replacement of aging infrastructure in the wastewater and stormwater sectors. Proposal packages must be received by 4 p.m. EDT, Friday, Oct. 29, 2010.

Demand for water and wastewater pipe in the U.S. is expected to rise 5.8 percent annually to $19.6 billion in 2014, exceeding 5.3 billion feet. Advances will reflect renewed activity in the residential building construction sector, the growing obsolescence of sewer and drainage systems and upgrades of municipal water systems. Copper pipe demand will rise at the fastest pace due to its close ties to the resurgent building construction segment.

SAWS rate-hike plan spurring opposition
Under a proposed new rate increase by San Antonio Water System (SAWS), businesses that use a lot of water to irrigate their properties could see their bills increase from 45 to 65 percent. The rate increase is slated for investment in much needed infrastructure.

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