WaterWorks

The city of Dearborn, MI, held a public meeting in June to propose sewer separation work to stop wastewater discharges in the Rouge River during heavy rains or spring thaw.

In the keynote address to the 2011 Pennsylvania Infrastructure Summit, Pennsylvania American Water President Kathy L. Pape said recently that expecting government bailouts is not a realistic, long-term solution to fix aging water and wastewater systems, which require tens of billions of dollars of capital investment.

The District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority (DC Water) Board of Directors has approved the Authority's largest contract to date, for the design and construction of a storage and conveyance tunnel as part of the Clean Rivers Project.

The city of Los Angeles, CA, recently completed 1 million feet of sewer that has been constructed or rehabilitated using trenchless technologies.

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) announced the publication of The Future of Water: A Startling Look Ahead. The authors, Steve Maxwell with Scott Yates, take a serious look at how the world will soon value water, use water and access water.

Glendale Water & Power (GWP) hosted the Provincial Electric Authority of Thailand in April at Glendale Water & Power’s administrative offices. The Provincial Electric Authority (PEA) is the national utility of Thailand serving 13 million customers.

The city of Dubuque, IA, has agreed to pay a $205,000 civil penalty and spend an additional $3 million on improvements to its water pollution control plant and sewer collection system over the next three years to settle a series of alleged violations of the federal Clean Water Act.

The city of Omaha, NE, is set to begin a $200 million project to install new infrastructure that will replace old sewer lines, which could mean as much as 2,000 jobs.

Insituform Technologies recently announced that it has been awarded its first stormwater pipeline rehabilitation contract from the Board of County Commissioners, Orange County, FL.

The city of Omaha, NE, is set to begin a $200 million project to install new infrastructure that will replace old sewer lines, which could mean as much as 2,000 jobs.

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