News

The Texas Water Development Board (TWDB) has approved a $49.9 million loan from the Clean Water State Revolving Fund to the city of Houston (Harris County) to finance wastewater system improvements.

Two House committees are attempting to combine slightly different pipeline safety bills while Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) is preventing a Senate vote on a bill passed by the Commerce Committee last May. All three bills are moderate, and make changes around the edges of current law, both with regard to natural gas and oil pipelines.

Jeff Griffin, Senior Editor

Pipeline Renewal Technologies is introducing an innovative method for monitoring cure temperature of cured-in-place-pipe (CIPP) liner installations.

Proactive safety -- that is Columbus, OH-based McDaniel’s Construction Corp.’s standard operating procedure whenever they have personnel working in a deep trench or pit. Such was the case when McDaniel’s recently installed 1,300 linear feet of conduit casing for electrical, communications and other utilities at the Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) in Columbus, OH.

The U.S. Department of Labor announced enhancements to its online enforcement database designed to improve public access to and understanding of the department’s enforcement actions.

Following a trench collapse that killed one worker and injured another, an Ohio excavation company now faces Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) penalties in excess of $150,000.

In June 2011, American Airlines’ Tulsa Engineering Facility personnel discovered a severe leak in their fire suppression system following a recent activation. The section of damaged pipeline was approximately 70 feet long and was situated 8 feet below a power substation, and encompassed one 10-inch tee. Dig and replace was not a viable option.

Preliminary results from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries released in August show little change in the number of workplace fatalities in 2010 compared with 2009.

The Metropolitan St. Louis Sewer District (MSD) signed a consent decree on Aug. 5 with regulators and environmentalists to make extensive improvements to its sewer systems and treatment plants, at an estimated cost of $4.7 billion over 23 years.

In an effort to learn continually from other operators and to improve North America’s pipeline system safety, the American Gas Association, the American Petroleum Institute, the Association of Oil Pipe Lines and the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America, together with the Canadian Gas Association and the Canadian Energy Pipeline Association, have initiated a comprehensive study to explore safety models and procedures currently utilized by other industry sectors in an effort to deliver natural gas and pipeline-transported liquids more safely and reliably.

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